How do I become a Vet in France

How do I become a Vet in France

Embarking on the journey to become a veterinarian in France is a noble pursuit that requires dedication, perseverance, and a clear understanding of the educational and professional requirements. Whether you aspire to care for beloved pets, work with livestock, or contribute to public health initiatives, the path to becoming a veterinarian in France offers a variety of opportunities for those passionate about animal welfare and veterinary medicine. In this guide, we’ll explore the steps involved in pursuing a career as a veterinarian in France.

  1. Research and Academic Opportunities
    For veterinarians with a passion for research and academia, opportunities abound in France’s vibrant veterinary education and research institutions. Beyond clinical practice, veterinarians can pursue careers in academia, teaching, and research, contributing to the advancement of veterinary science and education. Institutions such as the National Veterinary School of Alfort and the National Veterinary School of Lyon offer opportunities for veterinarians to engage in research projects, collaborate with colleagues, and mentor the next generation of veterinary professionals.


Becoming a veterinarian in France is a challenging yet rewarding journey that requires dedication, academic excellence, and practical experience. By following the steps outlined in this guide, aspiring veterinarians can navigate the path to achieving their professional goals and making a positive impact in the field of veterinary medicine. With a strong commitment to animal health and welfare, veterinarians in France play a crucial role in safeguarding the well-being of animals and contributing to public health initiatives.

  1. Practice Ownership and Entrepreneurship
    Many veterinarians in France aspire to own their own veterinary practices or pursue entrepreneurial ventures within the field. Owning a veterinary practice requires careful planning, financial management, and business acumen. Veterinarians interested in practice ownership may choose to start their own clinic, join an existing practice as a partner or associate, or explore alternative models such as mobile veterinary services or telemedicine platforms. Entrepreneurial-minded veterinarians can also diversify their practice offerings, expand into complementary services, or develop innovative solutions to address emerging challenges in veterinary care.
  1. Research and Academic Opportunities
    For veterinarians with a passion for research and academia, opportunities abound in France’s vibrant veterinary education and research institutions. Beyond clinical practice, veterinarians can pursue careers in academia, teaching, and research, contributing to the advancement of veterinary science and education. Institutions such as the National Veterinary School of Alfort and the National Veterinary School of Lyon offer opportunities for veterinarians to engage in research projects, collaborate with colleagues, and mentor the next generation of veterinary professionals.


Becoming a veterinarian in France is a challenging yet rewarding journey that requires dedication, academic excellence, and practical experience. By following the steps outlined in this guide, aspiring veterinarians can navigate the path to achieving their professional goals and making a positive impact in the field of veterinary medicine. With a strong commitment to animal health and welfare, veterinarians in France play a crucial role in safeguarding the well-being of animals and contributing to public health initiatives.

  1. Joining Professional Associations and Networks
    Veterinarians in France have the opportunity to join professional associations and networks that provide resources, support, and networking opportunities. One such organization is the French Veterinary Association (Association Vétérinaire Française, AVF), which represents veterinarians across various specialties and promotes excellence in veterinary practice, education, and research. Membership in professional associations allows veterinarians to stay connected with colleagues, access valuable resources, and advocate for the profession’s interests.
  1. Practice Ownership and Entrepreneurship
    Many veterinarians in France aspire to own their own veterinary practices or pursue entrepreneurial ventures within the field. Owning a veterinary practice requires careful planning, financial management, and business acumen. Veterinarians interested in practice ownership may choose to start their own clinic, join an existing practice as a partner or associate, or explore alternative models such as mobile veterinary services or telemedicine platforms. Entrepreneurial-minded veterinarians can also diversify their practice offerings, expand into complementary services, or develop innovative solutions to address emerging challenges in veterinary care.
  1. Research and Academic Opportunities
    For veterinarians with a passion for research and academia, opportunities abound in France’s vibrant veterinary education and research institutions. Beyond clinical practice, veterinarians can pursue careers in academia, teaching, and research, contributing to the advancement of veterinary science and education. Institutions such as the National Veterinary School of Alfort and the National Veterinary School of Lyon offer opportunities for veterinarians to engage in research projects, collaborate with colleagues, and mentor the next generation of veterinary professionals.


Becoming a veterinarian in France is a challenging yet rewarding journey that requires dedication, academic excellence, and practical experience. By following the steps outlined in this guide, aspiring veterinarians can navigate the path to achieving their professional goals and making a positive impact in the field of veterinary medicine. With a strong commitment to animal health and welfare, veterinarians in France play a crucial role in safeguarding the well-being of animals and contributing to public health initiatives.

  1. Continuing Education and Professional Development
    Once licensed, veterinarians in France are required to engage in continuing education to maintain and enhance their skills, stay current with advancements in veterinary medicine, and fulfill regulatory requirements. Continuing education opportunities include attending conferences, workshops, seminars, and online courses, as well as participating in peer-reviewed publications and research projects. By actively pursuing continuing education, veterinarians ensure that they remain competent and provide the highest quality care to their patients.
  1. Joining Professional Associations and Networks
    Veterinarians in France have the opportunity to join professional associations and networks that provide resources, support, and networking opportunities. One such organization is the French Veterinary Association (Association Vétérinaire Française, AVF), which represents veterinarians across various specialties and promotes excellence in veterinary practice, education, and research. Membership in professional associations allows veterinarians to stay connected with colleagues, access valuable resources, and advocate for the profession’s interests.
  1. Practice Ownership and Entrepreneurship
    Many veterinarians in France aspire to own their own veterinary practices or pursue entrepreneurial ventures within the field. Owning a veterinary practice requires careful planning, financial management, and business acumen. Veterinarians interested in practice ownership may choose to start their own clinic, join an existing practice as a partner or associate, or explore alternative models such as mobile veterinary services or telemedicine platforms. Entrepreneurial-minded veterinarians can also diversify their practice offerings, expand into complementary services, or develop innovative solutions to address emerging challenges in veterinary care.
  1. Research and Academic Opportunities
    For veterinarians with a passion for research and academia, opportunities abound in France’s vibrant veterinary education and research institutions. Beyond clinical practice, veterinarians can pursue careers in academia, teaching, and research, contributing to the advancement of veterinary science and education. Institutions such as the National Veterinary School of Alfort and the National Veterinary School of Lyon offer opportunities for veterinarians to engage in research projects, collaborate with colleagues, and mentor the next generation of veterinary professionals.


Becoming a veterinarian in France is a challenging yet rewarding journey that requires dedication, academic excellence, and practical experience. By following the steps outlined in this guide, aspiring veterinarians can navigate the path to achieving their professional goals and making a positive impact in the field of veterinary medicine. With a strong commitment to animal health and welfare, veterinarians in France play a crucial role in safeguarding the well-being of animals and contributing to public health initiatives.

  1. Professional Development and Specialization (Optional)
    Upon obtaining licensure, veterinarians in France have the option to pursue further specialization in a particular area of veterinary medicine through postgraduate training programs and certification exams. Specialization areas may include small animal medicine, equine medicine, food safety and public health, pathology, and more.
  1. Continuing Education and Professional Development
    Once licensed, veterinarians in France are required to engage in continuing education to maintain and enhance their skills, stay current with advancements in veterinary medicine, and fulfill regulatory requirements. Continuing education opportunities include attending conferences, workshops, seminars, and online courses, as well as participating in peer-reviewed publications and research projects. By actively pursuing continuing education, veterinarians ensure that they remain competent and provide the highest quality care to their patients.
  1. Joining Professional Associations and Networks
    Veterinarians in France have the opportunity to join professional associations and networks that provide resources, support, and networking opportunities. One such organization is the French Veterinary Association (Association Vétérinaire Française, AVF), which represents veterinarians across various specialties and promotes excellence in veterinary practice, education, and research. Membership in professional associations allows veterinarians to stay connected with colleagues, access valuable resources, and advocate for the profession’s interests.
  1. Practice Ownership and Entrepreneurship
    Many veterinarians in France aspire to own their own veterinary practices or pursue entrepreneurial ventures within the field. Owning a veterinary practice requires careful planning, financial management, and business acumen. Veterinarians interested in practice ownership may choose to start their own clinic, join an existing practice as a partner or associate, or explore alternative models such as mobile veterinary services or telemedicine platforms. Entrepreneurial-minded veterinarians can also diversify their practice offerings, expand into complementary services, or develop innovative solutions to address emerging challenges in veterinary care.
  1. Research and Academic Opportunities
    For veterinarians with a passion for research and academia, opportunities abound in France’s vibrant veterinary education and research institutions. Beyond clinical practice, veterinarians can pursue careers in academia, teaching, and research, contributing to the advancement of veterinary science and education. Institutions such as the National Veterinary School of Alfort and the National Veterinary School of Lyon offer opportunities for veterinarians to engage in research projects, collaborate with colleagues, and mentor the next generation of veterinary professionals.


Becoming a veterinarian in France is a challenging yet rewarding journey that requires dedication, academic excellence, and practical experience. By following the steps outlined in this guide, aspiring veterinarians can navigate the path to achieving their professional goals and making a positive impact in the field of veterinary medicine. With a strong commitment to animal health and welfare, veterinarians in France play a crucial role in safeguarding the well-being of animals and contributing to public health initiatives.

  1. Internship and Professional Licensing
    After completing their veterinary education, graduates must complete a mandatory internship, known as “internat,” which lasts for one year. During this internship, aspiring veterinarians gain practical experience under the supervision of licensed veterinarians, further developing their clinical skills and knowledge.

    Following successful completion of the internship, graduates must pass the national veterinary licensing examination (Examen National d’Aptitude, ENA) administered by the French Ministry of Agriculture. This examination assesses the candidate’s competency in various areas of veterinary medicine and is required for professional licensure.
  1. Professional Development and Specialization (Optional)
    Upon obtaining licensure, veterinarians in France have the option to pursue further specialization in a particular area of veterinary medicine through postgraduate training programs and certification exams. Specialization areas may include small animal medicine, equine medicine, food safety and public health, pathology, and more.
  1. Continuing Education and Professional Development
    Once licensed, veterinarians in France are required to engage in continuing education to maintain and enhance their skills, stay current with advancements in veterinary medicine, and fulfill regulatory requirements. Continuing education opportunities include attending conferences, workshops, seminars, and online courses, as well as participating in peer-reviewed publications and research projects. By actively pursuing continuing education, veterinarians ensure that they remain competent and provide the highest quality care to their patients.
  1. Joining Professional Associations and Networks
    Veterinarians in France have the opportunity to join professional associations and networks that provide resources, support, and networking opportunities. One such organization is the French Veterinary Association (Association Vétérinaire Française, AVF), which represents veterinarians across various specialties and promotes excellence in veterinary practice, education, and research. Membership in professional associations allows veterinarians to stay connected with colleagues, access valuable resources, and advocate for the profession’s interests.
  1. Practice Ownership and Entrepreneurship
    Many veterinarians in France aspire to own their own veterinary practices or pursue entrepreneurial ventures within the field. Owning a veterinary practice requires careful planning, financial management, and business acumen. Veterinarians interested in practice ownership may choose to start their own clinic, join an existing practice as a partner or associate, or explore alternative models such as mobile veterinary services or telemedicine platforms. Entrepreneurial-minded veterinarians can also diversify their practice offerings, expand into complementary services, or develop innovative solutions to address emerging challenges in veterinary care.
  1. Research and Academic Opportunities
    For veterinarians with a passion for research and academia, opportunities abound in France’s vibrant veterinary education and research institutions. Beyond clinical practice, veterinarians can pursue careers in academia, teaching, and research, contributing to the advancement of veterinary science and education. Institutions such as the National Veterinary School of Alfort and the National Veterinary School of Lyon offer opportunities for veterinarians to engage in research projects, collaborate with colleagues, and mentor the next generation of veterinary professionals.


Becoming a veterinarian in France is a challenging yet rewarding journey that requires dedication, academic excellence, and practical experience. By following the steps outlined in this guide, aspiring veterinarians can navigate the path to achieving their professional goals and making a positive impact in the field of veterinary medicine. With a strong commitment to animal health and welfare, veterinarians in France play a crucial role in safeguarding the well-being of animals and contributing to public health initiatives.

  1. Veterinary School Curriculum
    Once admitted to veterinary school, students undergo a rigorous five-year program leading to a Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM) degree. The curriculum combines theoretical coursework with practical training, covering a wide range of subjects such as anatomy, physiology, pharmacology, pathology, microbiology, surgery, and animal husbandry. Veterinary students also gain hands-on experience through clinical rotations in veterinary hospitals and clinics.
  1. Internship and Professional Licensing
    After completing their veterinary education, graduates must complete a mandatory internship, known as “internat,” which lasts for one year. During this internship, aspiring veterinarians gain practical experience under the supervision of licensed veterinarians, further developing their clinical skills and knowledge.

    Following successful completion of the internship, graduates must pass the national veterinary licensing examination (Examen National d’Aptitude, ENA) administered by the French Ministry of Agriculture. This examination assesses the candidate’s competency in various areas of veterinary medicine and is required for professional licensure.
  1. Professional Development and Specialization (Optional)
    Upon obtaining licensure, veterinarians in France have the option to pursue further specialization in a particular area of veterinary medicine through postgraduate training programs and certification exams. Specialization areas may include small animal medicine, equine medicine, food safety and public health, pathology, and more.
  1. Continuing Education and Professional Development
    Once licensed, veterinarians in France are required to engage in continuing education to maintain and enhance their skills, stay current with advancements in veterinary medicine, and fulfill regulatory requirements. Continuing education opportunities include attending conferences, workshops, seminars, and online courses, as well as participating in peer-reviewed publications and research projects. By actively pursuing continuing education, veterinarians ensure that they remain competent and provide the highest quality care to their patients.
  1. Joining Professional Associations and Networks
    Veterinarians in France have the opportunity to join professional associations and networks that provide resources, support, and networking opportunities. One such organization is the French Veterinary Association (Association Vétérinaire Française, AVF), which represents veterinarians across various specialties and promotes excellence in veterinary practice, education, and research. Membership in professional associations allows veterinarians to stay connected with colleagues, access valuable resources, and advocate for the profession’s interests.
  1. Practice Ownership and Entrepreneurship
    Many veterinarians in France aspire to own their own veterinary practices or pursue entrepreneurial ventures within the field. Owning a veterinary practice requires careful planning, financial management, and business acumen. Veterinarians interested in practice ownership may choose to start their own clinic, join an existing practice as a partner or associate, or explore alternative models such as mobile veterinary services or telemedicine platforms. Entrepreneurial-minded veterinarians can also diversify their practice offerings, expand into complementary services, or develop innovative solutions to address emerging challenges in veterinary care.
  1. Research and Academic Opportunities
    For veterinarians with a passion for research and academia, opportunities abound in France’s vibrant veterinary education and research institutions. Beyond clinical practice, veterinarians can pursue careers in academia, teaching, and research, contributing to the advancement of veterinary science and education. Institutions such as the National Veterinary School of Alfort and the National Veterinary School of Lyon offer opportunities for veterinarians to engage in research projects, collaborate with colleagues, and mentor the next generation of veterinary professionals.


Becoming a veterinarian in France is a challenging yet rewarding journey that requires dedication, academic excellence, and practical experience. By following the steps outlined in this guide, aspiring veterinarians can navigate the path to achieving their professional goals and making a positive impact in the field of veterinary medicine. With a strong commitment to animal health and welfare, veterinarians in France play a crucial role in safeguarding the well-being of animals and contributing to public health initiatives.

  1. National Veterinary School of Alfort (École nationale vétérinaire d’Alfort)
  2. National Veterinary School of Lyon (VetAgro Sup)
  3. National Veterinary School of Nantes (Oniris)
  4. National Veterinary School of Toulouse (École nationale vétérinaire de Toulouse)

    To gain admission to veterinary school, prospective students must pass a competitive entrance examination known as the “Concours A” or “Concours B.” The selection process typically includes written exams in subjects such as biology, chemistry, physics, and mathematics, as well as oral interviews and sometimes practical assessments. Preparation for these exams often involves attending preparatory classes or self-study.
  1. Veterinary School Curriculum
    Once admitted to veterinary school, students undergo a rigorous five-year program leading to a Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM) degree. The curriculum combines theoretical coursework with practical training, covering a wide range of subjects such as anatomy, physiology, pharmacology, pathology, microbiology, surgery, and animal husbandry. Veterinary students also gain hands-on experience through clinical rotations in veterinary hospitals and clinics.
  1. Internship and Professional Licensing
    After completing their veterinary education, graduates must complete a mandatory internship, known as “internat,” which lasts for one year. During this internship, aspiring veterinarians gain practical experience under the supervision of licensed veterinarians, further developing their clinical skills and knowledge.

    Following successful completion of the internship, graduates must pass the national veterinary licensing examination (Examen National d’Aptitude, ENA) administered by the French Ministry of Agriculture. This examination assesses the candidate’s competency in various areas of veterinary medicine and is required for professional licensure.
  1. Professional Development and Specialization (Optional)
    Upon obtaining licensure, veterinarians in France have the option to pursue further specialization in a particular area of veterinary medicine through postgraduate training programs and certification exams. Specialization areas may include small animal medicine, equine medicine, food safety and public health, pathology, and more.
  1. Continuing Education and Professional Development
    Once licensed, veterinarians in France are required to engage in continuing education to maintain and enhance their skills, stay current with advancements in veterinary medicine, and fulfill regulatory requirements. Continuing education opportunities include attending conferences, workshops, seminars, and online courses, as well as participating in peer-reviewed publications and research projects. By actively pursuing continuing education, veterinarians ensure that they remain competent and provide the highest quality care to their patients.
  1. Joining Professional Associations and Networks
    Veterinarians in France have the opportunity to join professional associations and networks that provide resources, support, and networking opportunities. One such organization is the French Veterinary Association (Association Vétérinaire Française, AVF), which represents veterinarians across various specialties and promotes excellence in veterinary practice, education, and research. Membership in professional associations allows veterinarians to stay connected with colleagues, access valuable resources, and advocate for the profession’s interests.
  1. Practice Ownership and Entrepreneurship
    Many veterinarians in France aspire to own their own veterinary practices or pursue entrepreneurial ventures within the field. Owning a veterinary practice requires careful planning, financial management, and business acumen. Veterinarians interested in practice ownership may choose to start their own clinic, join an existing practice as a partner or associate, or explore alternative models such as mobile veterinary services or telemedicine platforms. Entrepreneurial-minded veterinarians can also diversify their practice offerings, expand into complementary services, or develop innovative solutions to address emerging challenges in veterinary care.
  1. Research and Academic Opportunities
    For veterinarians with a passion for research and academia, opportunities abound in France’s vibrant veterinary education and research institutions. Beyond clinical practice, veterinarians can pursue careers in academia, teaching, and research, contributing to the advancement of veterinary science and education. Institutions such as the National Veterinary School of Alfort and the National Veterinary School of Lyon offer opportunities for veterinarians to engage in research projects, collaborate with colleagues, and mentor the next generation of veterinary professionals.


Becoming a veterinarian in France is a challenging yet rewarding journey that requires dedication, academic excellence, and practical experience. By following the steps outlined in this guide, aspiring veterinarians can navigate the path to achieving their professional goals and making a positive impact in the field of veterinary medicine. With a strong commitment to animal health and welfare, veterinarians in France play a crucial role in safeguarding the well-being of animals and contributing to public health initiatives.

  1. Admission to Veterinary School
    In France, veterinary education is provided by four national veterinary schools:
  1. National Veterinary School of Alfort (École nationale vétérinaire d’Alfort)
  2. National Veterinary School of Lyon (VetAgro Sup)
  3. National Veterinary School of Nantes (Oniris)
  4. National Veterinary School of Toulouse (École nationale vétérinaire de Toulouse)

    To gain admission to veterinary school, prospective students must pass a competitive entrance examination known as the “Concours A” or “Concours B.” The selection process typically includes written exams in subjects such as biology, chemistry, physics, and mathematics, as well as oral interviews and sometimes practical assessments. Preparation for these exams often involves attending preparatory classes or self-study.
  1. Veterinary School Curriculum
    Once admitted to veterinary school, students undergo a rigorous five-year program leading to a Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM) degree. The curriculum combines theoretical coursework with practical training, covering a wide range of subjects such as anatomy, physiology, pharmacology, pathology, microbiology, surgery, and animal husbandry. Veterinary students also gain hands-on experience through clinical rotations in veterinary hospitals and clinics.
  1. Internship and Professional Licensing
    After completing their veterinary education, graduates must complete a mandatory internship, known as “internat,” which lasts for one year. During this internship, aspiring veterinarians gain practical experience under the supervision of licensed veterinarians, further developing their clinical skills and knowledge.

    Following successful completion of the internship, graduates must pass the national veterinary licensing examination (Examen National d’Aptitude, ENA) administered by the French Ministry of Agriculture. This examination assesses the candidate’s competency in various areas of veterinary medicine and is required for professional licensure.
  1. Professional Development and Specialization (Optional)
    Upon obtaining licensure, veterinarians in France have the option to pursue further specialization in a particular area of veterinary medicine through postgraduate training programs and certification exams. Specialization areas may include small animal medicine, equine medicine, food safety and public health, pathology, and more.
  1. Continuing Education and Professional Development
    Once licensed, veterinarians in France are required to engage in continuing education to maintain and enhance their skills, stay current with advancements in veterinary medicine, and fulfill regulatory requirements. Continuing education opportunities include attending conferences, workshops, seminars, and online courses, as well as participating in peer-reviewed publications and research projects. By actively pursuing continuing education, veterinarians ensure that they remain competent and provide the highest quality care to their patients.
  1. Joining Professional Associations and Networks
    Veterinarians in France have the opportunity to join professional associations and networks that provide resources, support, and networking opportunities. One such organization is the French Veterinary Association (Association Vétérinaire Française, AVF), which represents veterinarians across various specialties and promotes excellence in veterinary practice, education, and research. Membership in professional associations allows veterinarians to stay connected with colleagues, access valuable resources, and advocate for the profession’s interests.
  1. Practice Ownership and Entrepreneurship
    Many veterinarians in France aspire to own their own veterinary practices or pursue entrepreneurial ventures within the field. Owning a veterinary practice requires careful planning, financial management, and business acumen. Veterinarians interested in practice ownership may choose to start their own clinic, join an existing practice as a partner or associate, or explore alternative models such as mobile veterinary services or telemedicine platforms. Entrepreneurial-minded veterinarians can also diversify their practice offerings, expand into complementary services, or develop innovative solutions to address emerging challenges in veterinary care.
  1. Research and Academic Opportunities
    For veterinarians with a passion for research and academia, opportunities abound in France’s vibrant veterinary education and research institutions. Beyond clinical practice, veterinarians can pursue careers in academia, teaching, and research, contributing to the advancement of veterinary science and education. Institutions such as the National Veterinary School of Alfort and the National Veterinary School of Lyon offer opportunities for veterinarians to engage in research projects, collaborate with colleagues, and mentor the next generation of veterinary professionals.


Becoming a veterinarian in France is a challenging yet rewarding journey that requires dedication, academic excellence, and practical experience. By following the steps outlined in this guide, aspiring veterinarians can navigate the path to achieving their professional goals and making a positive impact in the field of veterinary medicine. With a strong commitment to animal health and welfare, veterinarians in France play a crucial role in safeguarding the well-being of animals and contributing to public health initiatives.

  1. Academic Preparation
    The journey to becoming a veterinarian in France begins with a solid academic foundation. Prospective veterinary students must obtain a baccalauréat or its equivalent, which is a high school diploma or secondary school leaving certificate. It’s important to excel in science-related subjects such as biology, chemistry, and physics during secondary education to prepare for the rigorous curriculum ahead.
  1. Admission to Veterinary School
    In France, veterinary education is provided by four national veterinary schools:
  1. National Veterinary School of Alfort (École nationale vétérinaire d’Alfort)
  2. National Veterinary School of Lyon (VetAgro Sup)
  3. National Veterinary School of Nantes (Oniris)
  4. National Veterinary School of Toulouse (École nationale vétérinaire de Toulouse)

    To gain admission to veterinary school, prospective students must pass a competitive entrance examination known as the “Concours A” or “Concours B.” The selection process typically includes written exams in subjects such as biology, chemistry, physics, and mathematics, as well as oral interviews and sometimes practical assessments. Preparation for these exams often involves attending preparatory classes or self-study.
  1. Veterinary School Curriculum
    Once admitted to veterinary school, students undergo a rigorous five-year program leading to a Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM) degree. The curriculum combines theoretical coursework with practical training, covering a wide range of subjects such as anatomy, physiology, pharmacology, pathology, microbiology, surgery, and animal husbandry. Veterinary students also gain hands-on experience through clinical rotations in veterinary hospitals and clinics.
  1. Internship and Professional Licensing
    After completing their veterinary education, graduates must complete a mandatory internship, known as “internat,” which lasts for one year. During this internship, aspiring veterinarians gain practical experience under the supervision of licensed veterinarians, further developing their clinical skills and knowledge.

    Following successful completion of the internship, graduates must pass the national veterinary licensing examination (Examen National d’Aptitude, ENA) administered by the French Ministry of Agriculture. This examination assesses the candidate’s competency in various areas of veterinary medicine and is required for professional licensure.
  1. Professional Development and Specialization (Optional)
    Upon obtaining licensure, veterinarians in France have the option to pursue further specialization in a particular area of veterinary medicine through postgraduate training programs and certification exams. Specialization areas may include small animal medicine, equine medicine, food safety and public health, pathology, and more.
  1. Continuing Education and Professional Development
    Once licensed, veterinarians in France are required to engage in continuing education to maintain and enhance their skills, stay current with advancements in veterinary medicine, and fulfill regulatory requirements. Continuing education opportunities include attending conferences, workshops, seminars, and online courses, as well as participating in peer-reviewed publications and research projects. By actively pursuing continuing education, veterinarians ensure that they remain competent and provide the highest quality care to their patients.
  1. Joining Professional Associations and Networks
    Veterinarians in France have the opportunity to join professional associations and networks that provide resources, support, and networking opportunities. One such organization is the French Veterinary Association (Association Vétérinaire Française, AVF), which represents veterinarians across various specialties and promotes excellence in veterinary practice, education, and research. Membership in professional associations allows veterinarians to stay connected with colleagues, access valuable resources, and advocate for the profession’s interests.
  1. Practice Ownership and Entrepreneurship
    Many veterinarians in France aspire to own their own veterinary practices or pursue entrepreneurial ventures within the field. Owning a veterinary practice requires careful planning, financial management, and business acumen. Veterinarians interested in practice ownership may choose to start their own clinic, join an existing practice as a partner or associate, or explore alternative models such as mobile veterinary services or telemedicine platforms. Entrepreneurial-minded veterinarians can also diversify their practice offerings, expand into complementary services, or develop innovative solutions to address emerging challenges in veterinary care.
  1. Research and Academic Opportunities
    For veterinarians with a passion for research and academia, opportunities abound in France’s vibrant veterinary education and research institutions. Beyond clinical practice, veterinarians can pursue careers in academia, teaching, and research, contributing to the advancement of veterinary science and education. Institutions such as the National Veterinary School of Alfort and the National Veterinary School of Lyon offer opportunities for veterinarians to engage in research projects, collaborate with colleagues, and mentor the next generation of veterinary professionals.


Becoming a veterinarian in France is a challenging yet rewarding journey that requires dedication, academic excellence, and practical experience. By following the steps outlined in this guide, aspiring veterinarians can navigate the path to achieving their professional goals and making a positive impact in the field of veterinary medicine. With a strong commitment to animal health and welfare, veterinarians in France play a crucial role in safeguarding the well-being of animals and contributing to public health initiatives.

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