How long is Medical School in Europe?

How long is Medical School in Europe?

Medical education in Europe varies considerably from country to country, both in terms of structure and duration. Unlike the standardized medical education system in the United States, European countries have diverse approaches to training doctors. Here’s a breakdown of the typical duration of medical school in several European countries:

      1. United Kingdom
        Medical education in the UK generally takes five to six years to complete. This includes both undergraduate and postgraduate training. Students typically complete a Bachelor of Medicine, Bachelor of Surgery (MBBS) degree, which usually lasts for five years. Afterward, graduates undergo a two-year foundation program, during which they gain practical experience in different specialties.

        1. Germany
          In Germany, medical education typically takes six years to complete. Students first study for five years at medical school, followed by a practical year (known as the “Practical Year” or “PJ”), during which they work in hospitals under supervision. After completing the PJ, students take the state examination to obtain their medical license.

          1. France
            Medical education in France usually takes a minimum of nine years to complete. Students first complete the first cycle of medical studies (PACES) over the course of two years. Following this, they spend three years completing their second cycle of medical studies (DFASM), during which they focus on clinical training. Finally, students undergo the third cycle, which includes three years of specialized training in a particular medical field.

            1. Spain
              In Spain, medical education typically lasts for six years. Students complete a degree in Medicine, which is usually five or six years long. Afterward, graduates must complete a period of supervised practice, known as the medical internship (residencia), which can last from three to six years, depending on the chosen specialty.

              1. Italy
                Medical education in Italy generally takes six years to complete. Students first complete a three-year undergraduate course in Medicine and Surgery (the “Corso di Laurea Magistrale in Medicina e Chirurgia”). Following this, they undertake a three-year postgraduate program, which includes clinical rotations and specialty training.
              2. Netherlands
                In the Netherlands, medical education typically lasts for six years. Students complete a three-year bachelor’s program in Medicine, followed by a three-year master’s program. After completing their education, graduates must undergo further training to obtain their medical license.
              3. Sweden
                Medical education in Sweden typically lasts for about six and a half years. This includes five and a half years of theoretical and practical training in medical school, followed by a one-year internship (AT-tjänstgöring) at a hospital.
              4. Poland
                In Poland, medical education usually takes six years to complete. Students undergo a six-year integrated program, which combines preclinical and clinical studies. After graduation, they may choose to pursue further specialization through residency programs, which vary in duration depending on the chosen specialty.
              5. Greece
                Medical education in Greece generally lasts for six years. Students complete a six-year undergraduate program in Medicine, including preclinical and clinical training. After graduation, they may pursue additional training in a specific medical specialty.
              6. Russia
                In Russia, medical education typically takes six years to complete. Students study for six years in medical school, followed by a one-year internship (internatura) at a hospital. After completing the internship, graduates can obtain their medical license and practice medicine.
              7. Czech Republic
                Medical education in the Czech Republic usually lasts for six years. Students complete a six-year integrated program, which combines theoretical studies with practical training in hospitals and clinics. After graduation, they may choose to pursue further specialization through residency programs.
              8. Hungary
                In Hungary, medical education typically takes six years to complete. Students study for six years in medical school, including preclinical and clinical training. After graduation, they may undergo further training in a specific medical specialty.


            These examples demonstrate the diversity of medical education systems across Europe, with variations in the duration and structure of programs. Prospective medical students should carefully research the requirements and curriculum of medical schools in their chosen country to ensure they understand the full scope of their education and training.

            These are just a few examples, and there are many other variations in medical education across Europe. Additionally, some European countries offer accelerated or integrated programs that combine undergraduate and postgraduate training into a shorter time frame. Prospective medical students need to research the specific requirements and structure of medical education in the country where they plan to study.

            Share:

            More Posts

            How much do nurses earn?

            How much do nurses earn?

            Nurses play a vital role in healthcare systems worldwide, providing compassionate care, promoting health, and advocating for patients’ well-being. However, nurse salaries can vary significantly

            Universities Offering Nursing in Europe

            Universities Offering Nursing in Europe

            Nursing education in Europe is diverse and dynamic, reflecting the continent’s rich history and commitment to healthcare excellence. European universities offer a wide range of

            Send Us A Message